ILLUSTRATION

Alja Horvat’s Illustrations Take You Back a Few Decades

17/08/2018

Alja Horvat is an illustrator and graphic designer from Slovenia, working and studying in Ljubljana. She started drawing at a very young age and has continued her artistic career at High School for Design, now completing her studies at Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering. With a very distinctive style, Horvat’s illustrations show the everyday life in portrait style settings, depicting female figures in colorful retro clothing, with humorous titles such as ‘Don’t Leave Me Waiting’, ‘Sweater Weather’ and ‘Pizza Lady’.

how many plants is enough Alja Horvat

Working mainly digitally, Horvat also loves acrylics, gouache, and watercolors. The use of texture and down to earth colors mixed with blazing oranges muted greens and, dare I say, the infamous millennial pink create an atmosphere reminiscent of the past decades while being deeply rooted in the present. It’s fun to imagine the story behind the women in Horvat’s illustrations, from the stunning fashion they wear to the environment they are placed in. Flowers and lush botanical themes are constant, often combined with psychedelic patterns as backgrounds. Her work has a vintage feel, recalling the heydays of feminism and female empowerment of the 60’s and 70’s.

Horvat utilized modern day tools, such as Pinterest and Instagram in her research and stays in close contact with her followers, often asking them what they’d like to see her work on next. Follow her here.

sweater weather Alja Horvat

i prefer cats Alja Horvat illustration

Alja Horvat illustration

we are all magical Alja Horvat illustration

Alja Horvat illustration

dont leave me waiting Alja Horvat illustration

night in desert Alja Horvat illustration

Photos © Anja Horvat

 

ART, EDITORIAL

Paper Cut Book ‘Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology’ By Mary Komary

15/08/2018

Paper cutting is a form of paper art in which most-often a single sheet of paper is cut in ways which creates negative and positive space as a pattern, landscape or silhouette. What’s fascinating is that with an age-old medium: paper, you can create anything from simple graphic designs to incredibly detailed three-dimensional images. The beautiful ‘Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology’ book by Russian designer Mary Komary is filled with delicate papercut illustration, alight and photographed in a way which creates ethereal sceneries of the city.

Paper Cut Book 'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' By Mary Komary

A graduate of the Stieglitz Academy of Art and Design graphic design department, Komary has a strong aesthetic style, working in projects involving packaging, branding, illustration, book design as well as paper arts, like paper cutting. Her latest project, a book about St.Petersburg – Russia’s second largest city and the main cultural center – is a true beauty, especially for all paper lovers.

Komary created a series of papercut illustrations about the city for the project. Stunning paper models cut out from paper and photographed under various lighting conditions. The book shows the four conditions of the city: morning, day, evening and night. The “Essays of Petersburg mythology” is a collection of myths, legends, and tales about the city, on the pages of the book the reader can see it’s typical citizens, their life, humor, uniqueness.

'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' Paper-Cut Illustration By Mary Komary

Paper Cut Book 'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' By Mary Komary

'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' Paper-Cut Illustration By Mary Komary

'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' Paper-Cut Illustration By Mary Komary

Paper Cut Book 'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' By Mary Komary

'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' Paper-Cut Illustration By Mary Komary

'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' Paper-Cut Illustration By Mary Komary

Paper Cut Book 'Essays of St.Petersburg Mythology' By Mary Komary

Images © Mary Komary

ILLUSTRATION

52 Sweltering Hot Summer Illustrations

08/08/2018

We’ve reached the heat peak of the summer with temperatures rising closer to the forties here in Central Europe, and to be honest, I do not feel bad about spending at least half of my days indoors in front of a cooling fan. And I know there are some kindred spirits over on the other side of the screen! So while we wait for the heat to simmer down to bearable digits, we can enjoy these fifty-two inspiring, cool and down-right stunning illustrations by 26 talented artists.

Will you be inspired to pack your swimming trunks and suntan lotion and head down to the beach, or will you vicariously live through these imaginary characters?

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Malika Favre

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Bodil Jane

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Irene Rinaldi

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Felicity Marshall

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Petra Eriksson

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Tom Haugomat

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Fago Studio

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Angela McKay

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Olimpia Zagnoli

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Steve Frykholm

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Kim Sielbeck

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Arnelle Woker

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Yann Kebbi

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Tallulah Fontaine

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Eleonora Arosio

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Marylou Faure

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Patrick Hruby

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Eline Van Dam, aka Zeloot

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Isabelle Feliu

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Miranda Sofroniou

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Virginia Johnson

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Celeste Sánchez Demare

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Ryo Takemasa

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Fred Péault

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Yuko Shimizu

summer illustrationsummer illustration

by Willian Santiago

 

 

BRANDING, EVENTS

How much tolerance does design need? Design Month Graz 2018 Visual Identity

06/08/2018

The Design Month Graz gives insights into the current state of design in the form of exhibitions, workshops, and lectures, welcoming over 100,000 people to network in the UNESCO city of Graz every spring. This year’s motto dealt with the theme of tolerance and design, which was realized in the visual identity by Studio Zwupp together with Paul Leichtfried – with rule breaks, mixtures, and country flags.

Design triggers emotions which are located between aversion and approval, enthusiasm and disappointment, outrage and indifference. Yet, who is the one to say what is beautiful? Who says what works for whom and why? And who judges good taste – and why?  These were the questions on center stage for the four-week-long festival last May. Design Month Graz celebrated its 10th year with a dense 4-week long program of thought-provoking events.

With serious questions and issues at the core of this years theme, Studio Zwupp created an adaptive, modular graphic language to support it, with patterns mimicking the breaking of order. Covering everything from coffee cups to beer labels and animations (see on Design Month Graz facebook page) to a printed newspaper, the graphic design follows a minimalistic three-color theme with geometric patterns being the red thread.

The clever repetition of bold patterns in primary colors and the thoughtful use of borrowed imagery from flag symbols, together with order-breaking animation create tension, which further creates an exciting, provocative visual identity.

Images © Studio Zwupp